Air Induction System Removal

The Air Induction System is an emissions control mechanism designed to introduce additional air in with the exhaust gases on closed throttle to complete the burning of those gases. This is a complex system that introduces additional weight, complexity, and is an obstacle to accessing other engine areas such as the spark plugs for maintenance.

Caution: the removal of this system may cause your bike to violate emissions regulations, fail emissions tests, and possibly void your warranty.

Ivan's Performance Products makes a kit to facilitate the removal of the Air Induction System. This is Ivan's kit. Price is $35 and includes 3 rubber caps (the red cap is for the R1 and is not used here), a special very high quality hardened 5/16"-24 tap, and four stainless allen screws for the tapped holes.

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My thanks to Bill Jinks of the Owners Association who provided valuable expert advice that was of great help to me during this project.

Installation:

  1. Drain Coolant
  2. Remove Radiator
  3. Paint Radiator Guard (not part of kit installation)
  4. Remove Air Induction Hardware
  5. Tap Fittings at Exhaust Ports
  6. Cap Openings with Provided Fittings from Kit
  7. Reassemble Bike

1. Drain Coolant:

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2. Remove Radiator:

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Disconnect Water Inlet Hose

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Disconnect Carburetor Hose

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Disconnect Oil Cooler Hose

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Disconnect Water Outlet Hose

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Remove Radiator

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3. Paint Radiator Guard (not part of kit installation):

Remove Guard from Radiator

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Before and After Photos of Radiator Guard Painting

4. Remove Air Induction Hardware:

Remove Airbox Intake Hose

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Remove Air Pump Bracket

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Remove Tube Positioning Bracket Screw

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Remove Carb #4 Connecting Hose

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Unscrew Exhaust Port Tube Clamps

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Remove Tube Connecting Hoses

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Remove Air Pump

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Replace Tube Positioning Screw

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Reassemble Air Induction System for Storage

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5. Tap Fittings at Exhaust Ports:

This was not as bad as I had feared. I worked slowly and had no problems.

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When you finish tapping you will be left with four holes full of steel cuttings and grease. Here are the options:

  1. Use a greased Q-tip to clean out the hole and push down the remaining grease blob down into the exhaust manifold. (Need I mention not to drop the Q-tip into the hole?) When you next start the engine those blobs will be blown out the exhaust pipes.
  2. Start the engine very briefly (it has no coolant) and watch the exhaust pressure blow the grease/cuttings blobs out the four holes.
  3. Remove the exhaust header pipes (8 bolts plus the center bolt plus possibly the exhaust pipe clamp) and clean up the holes using a Q-tip pushed up the holes followed by blasts of compressed air to finish the job.

I called Ivan and asked his advice. I was told the grease/cuttings are far downstream from the engine, cannot do any damage, and if pushed down the holes would simply be blown out the exhaust. I chose option 1. If you are really concerned about this then do the extra work and go with option 3. Option 2 is too scary.

If you do happen to break a tap while doing this, I am informed that the fittings can be removed by slowly rocking them back and forth with a thin-tipped screwdriver and a hammer using a chisel and pry loose technique. The tap can then be more easily extracted with the fitting removed from the bike. The fitting can then be replaced on the bike after finishing the tapping (with a new tap). Use a good amount of permanent, high-temperature (red) loctite on the fitting.

6. Cap Openings with Provided Fittings from Kit:

There are no torque specs on these Stainless Allen Screws. Just make them tight but be careful not to strip your new threads.

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Install the Blue and Black Plastic Caps

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7. Reassemble Bike:

Replace drained coolant with a new mixture. Use an ethylene glycol based anti-freeze with corrosion inhibitors for aluminum engines low in silicates. Mix 50% with distilled water.

If you want to do a more complete job of changing the coolant, the reservoir under the seat can be emptied and then refilled with a turkey baster. If the turkey baster doesn't work well then a suction tool like the MityVac, described here, will do the job. Also, prior to reinstalling the drain plug, distilled water can be repeatedly poured in through the radiator until the exit water is clear.

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  • Reinstall Radiator Cap
  • Reinstall Right Fairing Insert
  • Turn Fuel Petcock to ON
  • Reinstall Fuel Tank Hold Down Bolt, Torque to 10 Nm, 7.2 lb-ft
  • Reinstall Seat
  • Start Bike and Check for Coolant Leaks
  • Verify Coolant Level After First Ride

Ride Report: Removal of the Air Induction System appears to have greatly reduced the tendency of the exhaust to gurgle and pop on deceleration.

Before and After photos showing additional access clearance on top of engine

Addendum:

It was pointed out to me by Herman Stam that the 'decorative' rubber piece in the radiator guard was originally installed on the inside of the guard to keep the screen properly spaced from the radiator in the event of an impact or from buzzing. I had overlooked that function and, believing it to be merely decorative, had reinstalled it on the outside, rendering it useless. It should be installed on the inside of the guard. Thanks Herman!

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Last Updated: 04-04-2005

Copyright © 2001-05, Patrick Glenn, All Rights Reserved.
Yamaha® and FZ1® are registered trademarks of the Yamaha Motor Corporation.
This site is not affiliated in any way with the Yamaha Motor Corporation.

The information presented here reflects solely my personal experience with my motorcycle and is presented for entertainment purposes only. No information presented here is to be relied upon for issues of rider safety nor to replace the services of a qualified service technician. Any attempts to follow or duplicate any of these procedures are done so completely at your own risk. By reading the information on this site, you agree to assume complete responsibility for any and all actual or consequential damages that may arise from any information presented herein.